Category Archives: social@ogilvy

social@ogilvy

Beyond Cats & Bloopers: Getting Real on the Future of YouTube

Change is coming. You may not realize it. It’s happening slowly. The content we share is evolving. It’s getting more sophisticated and more polished every day. You can trace it in part to a series of hyper-wired buildings around the world where the influential denizens of our time gather; a byproduct of the sharing economy that promises to make film and video production facilities accessible to individual creators. These are the YouTube Spaces.

YT space

Social@Ogilvy recently toured the Los Angeles location, complete with sound stages, equipment offerings, event spaces, and a barista bar.

The grounds were abuzz with creative energy, buttressed by the influx of creative agencies moving into the neighborhood (Ogilvy & Mather among them). Creators and influencers of all shapes and sizes – from individuals to sizeable production crews – were sharing hallways amid the throws of production. On the day of our tour the main lounge area was being retrofitted for production of a large-scale live-stream talk-show, a game show was shooting on one stage, a music video shoot was being setup in another, and smaller productions were taking advantage of green screens and audio booths. Google even provides equipment for use on site, including a set of Red Epic cameras and cinema lenses. In other words, everything you’d need to make a movie except the crew.

But how can these Spaces benefit brands, many of which already partner with influencers?

There are three key areas where YouTube spaces can work to a brand’s advantage:

  1. Creator skills development
  2. State of the art production facilities provided by creators
  3. Opportunities to create first-of-it’s-kind productions

In order to maintain the social nature of the resources though, YouTube limits the amount of access a creator receives each month, ranging from one day a month in a living room sized studio to six days use of full size sound stages.

The reason for all this lies in YouTube’s emerging business strategy: empowering and educating creators to create better quality content makes YouTube more desirable to audiences and allows the streamer to compete with services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime. They’ve already seen success with scripted influencer series such as Video Game High School and The Guild.

The philosophy – which I share – is that better content begets more views, and for YouTube, more views lead to more pre-roll ads, which generate more revenue. The result is clear. We’ve seen it manifest through player design refreshes and the evolution of influencer talent agencies: YouTube has moved past cat videos and bloopers. They’ve even started building their own original content.

Social@Ogilvy already works with creators to generate awareness, such as partnering with Meg DeAngelis (MayBaby) to launch Intel’s Pocket Avatars, and brands will only continue to benefit as influencers become more practiced and familiar with the tradecraft of production through their use of YouTube’s Spaces. However, rising audience expectations could drive up the cost of productions, especially those not filmed at a YouTube Space, when factoring in location and equipment fees.

While brands are welcome to use the Spaces if partnering with a creator who lends his or her access for a brand’s production, there is one line of fine print to be aware of: anything shot in a YouTube Space – even if only partially lensed there – must debut on YouTube simultaneously or before any other medium. That means launching your Super Bowl TV spot on YouTube before it airs in the Super Bowl. And for some, that could be the deal-breaker.

Ultimately, YouTube’s Space facilities – with locations in Los Angeles, London, Tokyo, New York, São Paulo, and Berlin – don’t offer an advantage over renting production facilities elsewhere. The true impact for brands, and the reason to keep a close eye on YouTube’s ongoing investment in talent, is that they’re driving better content. Audiences are growing to expect a higher level of storytelling, an expectation will expand to encompass brands, and quality will only continue to become more important for brands as this space grows more competitive.

YouTube has charged creators with ushering us into a new era of socially successful films and videos. It’s up to the rest of us to keep up with them.

Join our webinar Pharma In Social: How To Succeed

Join this webinar to learn how pharma companies can drive business value from engaging in social media.

The fast-moving pace of social media, and the powerful amplifying effect that it can have on perceptions about a brand, means that even for the bravest of businesses it can be a daunting space. And for pharma companies the added regulatory boundaries and compliance constraints do not always go hand-in-hand with the norms of social media. But that is no reason to stay away from the game.

While there is evidence of ‘social anxiety’ across the global pharma industry, many organisations are getting involved in the online conversation. Ogilvy CommonHealth has conducted an analysis of these brands to understand the landscape and identify the trends and best practices that are driving pharma companies’ success in social media.

In this webinar, we will review the study on pharma in social and discuss:

  • What is the landscape and how has it changed?
  • Who are the top performers and why?
  • What are the best practices?

Join the discussion at these times:

Even if you can’t make it to the session, sign up anyway for a copy of the deck.

To receive invitations for all of our webinars, please subscribe here.

See you on the webinar!

Getting Social @ Ogilvy with Thierry Soubestre, Page Karma

Data has always been important for brands to better understand consumers and target messages. With the amount of data collected through social networking sites – what they do, things they like, causes they defend, what they buy, and the list goes on - understanding how to cut and analyze the data to derive consumer insights can be daunting task.

Our partner agency Page Karma is a leader in this space, offering solutions to help brands better understand consumers and optimize communications strategies. We spoke with Thierry Soubestre, General Director at Page Karma, to learn more about his company and what impact data will have for the future of the industry.

S@O: In 140 characters or less, tell us what everyone should know about Page Karma.  

TS: Page Karma accompanies you throughout your social media presence in order to help you understand it, measure your performance and improve!

S@O: What do you think Page Karma will be doing this time next year?

TS: We will work on ways to improve the knowledge and understanding of our “real-life” customers based on their Social Networks activity.

S@O: Name one prediction for the future of the advertising, PR, and communications industry.

TS: The Advertising and the Social Media industries will be more tightly integrated and more than ever will be influenced by Data.

S@O: What was your last update to a social media platform?

TS: A few hours ago about our brand new Profiling & Market Research service named Profiler.

 S@O: If you could be Facebook friends with anyone in the world, who would it be?

TS: I can’t just pick one.

Excitement and Controversy Over Facebook Instant Articles

With Facebook’s announcement of Instant Articles this week comes excitement and controversy. While the update boasts an improved user experience with faster, richer content, for some there is worry that publishers will lose control of their content creation and distribution.

Only time will tell the legitimacy of these claims and concerns, but one thing for certain is that Instant Articles will change the way content is consumed on the platform. And while Instant Articles is currently limited to nine partner publishers, it’s important for brands to understand how the update changes the platform’s dynamics, what opportunities it presents, and consider how it might play into the broader content strategy when access to the tool is opened up to a wider audience.

In the slides below, we give a review of Instant Articles and discuss the implications both for brands and the industry as a whole.

Mobilegeddon and Adapting to a Mobile-Centric Consumer Base

A few weeks ago, Mobilegeddon was the cause of much panic. Google’s update to its mobile search algorithm had many worried that the change would affect their website searchability, bringing about lasting effects on their businesses.

Now that the change has taken place and the initial excitement has passed, we took a look at the opportunities the updates present for brands in the longer term.

What impact, if any, has Mobilegeddon had on your website? Tell us in the comments below.

How to Test Social Data Accuracy: Self-Reported Data vs. Third-Party Data

In an increasingly more sophisticated paid social environment, where targeting criteria grow with every day though still coming from self-reported data, the need to focus on measuring performance based on audience quality and not purely based on quantitative metrics becomes imperative.

As a result the question of using self-reported social data vs. third-party data becomes key to delivering quality AND quantity. The second question that comes out of this need for looking at performance outside the social vanity metrics of new followers or people who saw a social post, is the accuracy of self-reported data across social platforms.

So how do you test social data accuracy and how do you decide if third party data might be a better choice to reach your audience across a social platform?

To answer those questions, we’ve done a little test of our own at Social@Neo recently to analyse the accuracy of employment data specifically – as offered by LinkedIn vs. Facebook, against a known data set.

How we tested:

We worked with Ogilvy Group’s HR departments in the US and the UK to collect data about Ogilvy Staffers across all companies of the group. The data set we received was split by company, age range and sex.

Both Facebook’s and LinkedIn’s advertising audience data allows us to segment users based on the following criteria – company they work for, location and sex.

So we created a target audience segment following the criteria we had available for both the known data set and the advertising platforms for the two networks – employed by one of the Ogilvy companies and based in the UK or the USA.

Each of the platforms gave us a number that reflected the number of users that matched those criteria. Here are the results against the known data set:

Screen Shot 2015-05-13 at 10.51.27 AM

As the data provided by Ogilvy Group’s HR department only included permanent employees, we expected to see a variation of +/- 5% variation.

However, the variation was as high as +/- 17%.

17% more LinkedIn users declared they work for one of the Ogilvy group companies in the USA or the UK. While the variation is quite high, given the assumptions above, the number is likely to be closer to reality, as it is higher.

17% less Facebook users declared they work for one of the Ogilvy group companies in the USA or the UK. Even with the assumptions made at the beginning of the test, the number is very low and shows a significant inconsistency between the real data and the self-reported data on the platform.

Furthermore, the percentage of women who declared they work for one of the Ogilvy group companies on Facebook is much higher than the percentage provided to us by the HR department.

 

What does this mean? Three things:

  1. If you have access to a known data set, it is always worth testing it against the data offered by the social platform and assess accuracy and the need to use third party data.
  2. As always, and across all platforms, the more niche and accurate your targeting is, the more likely it is you will end up paying more. As expected, LinkedIn data has a higher level of accuracy than Facebook when it comes to targeting based on work information. This also explains why the CPC for LinkedIn is higher as well. You pay for the higher quality of the engagements and not just for the number of clicks.
  3. While not a very detailed test, these results also give us a number as a reference point of the deviation from the truth – neither network is accurate, but because Ogilvy data includes only FTEs, and not freelancers/part-timers, you’re right in assuming that LinkedIn data looks more accurate.

Short-Form Content Tops 2015 March Madness Social Media Trends

On the hard court, the NCAA March Madness front-runner is clear: Kentucky stands out without a doubt.

In social media, however, March Madness doesn’t seem to have a winner.

Every year, I scour the web looking for the best trends in platform usage, user behaviors and content on social media during the NCAA’s annual college basketball tournament. But this year, there were no major “trends” at all—just one giant glob of short-form content.

This should come as no surprise to fans, with GIFs, Vines and Instagram videos saturating the sports world more and more every day. At the same time, it’s remarkable that this year’s tournament has maintained last year’s level of hype and popularity with good-ol’-fashioned online conversation and short-form content.

Why does short-form content pair so perfectly with sports? It’s simple: Highlight reels featuring fleeting moments in time—both on and off the field—are the coin of the realm in sports coverage.

The most recent famous example of a moment brought to life is March Madness’s Sad Piccolo Girl. Lasting only seconds on live television, this clip soon became a viral sensation on Instagram, Vine, Tumblr and beyond. Short-form content allows us to encapsulate these highlights in a format that we can easily watch and rewatch again and again.

It’s not just young people doing it, either. This year, Snapchat inked a deal with Turner Sports, CBS Sports and the NCAA to provide access to user-generated content (aka “snaps”) created throughout the tournament. In return, Snapchat reportedly will allow livestreaming during the Final Four, offering a way for users to tune-in on the go.

While the obvious implication is related to second screen viewing habits, the more interesting story is Snapchat’s attempt to convert its 200+ million monthly active user base (built, notably, on the appeal of short-form content) into long-form media viewers.

Brands are creeping onto new-ish short-form platforms like SnapChat and Vine, but are still trying to perfect the delicate balance between providing value versus staying on-brand. GoPro struck this balance nicely with its Instagram video featuring trick shot king David Kalb, creating entertaining content without over-the-top branding.

We look forward to seeing more understated but effective pieces as we enter the Final Four this weekend.

What was your favorite piece of short-form content from this year’s tournament? Here’s mine.

Short-Form Content Tops 2015 March Madness Social Media Trends

On the hard court, the NCAA March Madness front-runner is clear: Kentucky stands out without a doubt.

In social media, however, March Madness doesn’t seem to have a winner.

Every year, I scour the web looking for the best trends in platform usage, user behaviors and content on social media during the NCAA’s annual college basketball tournament. But this year, there were no major “trends” at all—just one giant glob of short-form content.

This should come as no surprise to fans, with GIFs, Vines and Instagram videos saturating the sports world more and more every day. At the same time, it’s remarkable that this year’s tournament has maintained last year’s level of hype and popularity with good-ol’-fashioned online conversation and short-form content.

Why does short-form content pair so perfectly with sports? It’s simple: Highlight reels featuring fleeting moments in time—both on and off the field—are the coin of the realm in sports coverage.

The most recent famous example of a moment brought to life is March Madness’s Sad Piccolo Girl. Lasting only seconds on live television, this clip soon became a viral sensation on Instagram, Vine, Tumblr and beyond. Short-form content allows us to encapsulate these highlights in a format that we can easily watch and rewatch again and again.

It’s not just young people doing it, either. This year, Snapchat inked a deal with Turner Sports, CBS Sports and the NCAA to provide access to user-generated content (aka “snaps”) created throughout the tournament. In return, Snapchat reportedly will allow livestreaming during the Final Four, offering a way for users to tune-in on the go.

While the obvious implication is related to second screen viewing habits, the more interesting story is Snapchat’s attempt to convert its 200+ million monthly active user base (built, notably, on the appeal of short-form content) into long-form media viewers.

Brands are creeping onto new-ish short-form platforms like SnapChat and Vine, but are still trying to perfect the delicate balance between providing value versus staying on-brand. GoPro struck this balance nicely with its Instagram video featuring trick shot king David Kalb, creating entertaining content without over-the-top branding.

We look forward to seeing more understated but effective pieces as we enter the Final Four this weekend.

What was your favorite piece of short-form content from this year’s tournament? Here’s mine.

Read This Before Choosing Meerkat or Periscope

 UPDATED: April 06, 2015

meerkat vs periscope

Last week I went to my first NBA game and discovered a purpose for two things:

  1. A selfie stick
  2. The app I had downloaded but not yet properly used – Meerkat

It was a nail-biter end to the game so I started to stream it live. In a matter of seconds there was a handful of strangers watching the Kings beat the 76ers with me.

NBA game Meerkat tweet

Then, just as I got the hang of Meerkat, Periscope – the Meerkat “killer” – launches. Lots of new streaming opportunity in such a short amount of time. So what exactly do they do, and how can you start using them in your work? Here’s a quick and dirty breakdown.

What do they do?

Meerkat:

Meerkat launched in late February and really found its footing during South by Southwest, as attendees started streaming live panels and concerts, and the tech press really hyped the app.

As my fellow Social@Ogilvy contributor Teresa pointed out, the app’s premise is simple: you quickly log in using your Twitter username, describe what you’re seeing, hit “stream”, and your followers are alerted to start watching. You can schedule a stream for a later time, too. After the stream, the video disappears a la Snapchat.

Periscope:

From Tyra Banks to Jimmy Fallon and Aaron Paul, celebrities have been quick to test out Periscope – the Twitter-acquired answer to Meerkat that launched on March 26. The differences in the apps are subtle, but important.

Both apps rely heavily on Twitter, but only Periscope has access to Twitter’s full social graph, which makes discovering streams from people you already follow so much easier. After you’re done streaming, Periscope saves your stream to your phone’s camera roll and to your Periscope profile.

So while celebrities are onboard with Periscope, and many are predicting Meerkat’s demise, it’s likely that one or more live stream apps will continue to build a following in some fashion and it’s worth thinking about how or if to use them in your work. There are so many opportunities.

How can you use them?

The better question may be: should you use these apps? As with every new app or platform, the socially savvy brands are already starting to see how they can play along. There’s something about spontaneous streaming from a cell phone that makes Periscope and Meerkat exciting, but also intimidating, for brands. Five things to keep in mind before you jump into the streaming fray:

  1. Be Authentic: this is a biggie. Don’t force a live stream that doesn’t make sense or it will be awkward, a waste of time, or it may present a bad look for your brand. Do you have something notable like an event or announcement happening that your average follower/customer would truly care about? If yes, then pull out your iPhone and give it a shot. If your brand is big on behind-the-scenes content, streaming will be a fantastically authentic activity.
  2. Have Real Conversations: a live stream isn’t just another opportunity to share a scripted brand message – talk to your followers. Consider using a live stream as a real-time sounding board for new ideas. Literally ask questions and give authentic unscripted answers.
  3. Partner with Influencers: you may be working at a small or niche organization that doesn’t have a ready-made following to find you on Periscope or Meerkat. Consider partnering with a person or organization that compliments what you’re trying to do, and has a dedicated following. Maybe you do a joint live stream. Maybe you sponsor an influencer’s personal stream at your brand’s event.
  4. Be Creative: the benefit of a new app or platform is that there are no established rules. Some of the more obvious uses are at events like New York Fashion Week or a big press announcement. Imagine a designer streaming and giving live commentary as their collection is on the runway. Maybe your CEO is about to give a big speech and decides to stream a preview to the announcement. Better yet, why doesn’t the CEO break some news on Meerkat? If you’re thinking about distributing a piece of content on other social media channels, take a second and see if there’s an opportunity to do it via live stream.
  5. Test and Learn: your first live stream may attract five thousand viewers. It may attract no viewers. You might find that people enjoy when you stream video from brainstorms in your conference room or you might find that you only attract viewers when your celebrity spokespeople are hosting the stream. Give it a shot in various formats and track your results to see how they map back to your overall marketing goals.

 
Selfie Sticks

Oh – the selfie stick. Right. One big downside of these apps is arm strength. Who wants to hold their phone up during a basketball game or a concert or a press conference? Periscope should sell a branded stick through Twitter. I’d buy one.

Meerkat vs. Periscope: Top Line Takeaways for Mobile Live Streaming

Read This Before Choosing Meerkat or Periscope

 

meerkat vs periscope

Last week I went to my first NBA game and discovered a purpose for two things:

  1. A selfie stick
  2. The app I had downloaded but not yet properly used – Meerkat

It was a nail-biter end to the game so I started to stream it live. In a matter of seconds there was a handful of strangers watching the Kings beat the 76ers with me.

NBA game Meerkat tweet

Then, just as I got the hang of Meerkat, Periscope – the Meerkat “killer” – launches. Lots of new streaming opportunity in such a short amount of time. So what exactly do they do, and how can you start using them in your work? Here’s a quick and dirty breakdown.

What do they do?

Meerkat:

Meerkat launched in late February and really found its footing during South by Southwest, as attendees started streaming live panels and concerts, and the tech press really hyped the app.

As my fellow Social@Ogilvy contributor Teresa pointed out, the app’s premise is simple: you quickly log in using your Twitter username, describe what you’re seeing, hit “stream”, and your followers are alerted to start watching. You can schedule a stream for a later time, too. After the stream, the video disappears a la Snapchat.

Periscope:

From Tyra Banks to Jimmy Fallon and Aaron Paul, celebrities have been quick to test out Periscope – the Twitter-acquired answer to Meerkat that launched on March 26. The differences in the apps are subtle, but important.

Both apps rely heavily on Twitter, but only Periscope has access to Twitter’s full social graph, which makes discovering streams from people you already follow so much easier. After you’re done streaming, Periscope saves your stream to your phone’s camera roll and to your Periscope profile.

So while celebrities are onboard with Periscope, and many are predicting Meerkat’s demise, it’s likely that one or more live stream apps will continue to build a following in some fashion and it’s worth thinking about how or if to use them in your work. There are so many opportunities.

How can you use them?

The better question may be: should you use these apps? As with every new app or platform, the socially savvy brands are already starting to see how they can play along. There’s something about spontaneous streaming from a cell phone that makes Periscope and Meerkat exciting, but also intimidating, for brands. Five things to keep in mind before you jump into the streaming fray:

  1. Be Authentic: this is a biggie. Don’t force a live stream that doesn’t make sense or it will be awkward, a waste of time, or it may present a bad look for your brand. Do you have something notable like an event or announcement happening that your average follower/customer would truly care about? If yes, then pull out your iPhone and give it a shot. If your brand is big on behind-the-scenes content, streaming will be a fantastically authentic activity.
  2. Have Real Conversations: a live stream isn’t just another opportunity to share a scripted brand message – talk to your followers. Consider using a live stream as a real-time sounding board for new ideas. Literally ask questions and give authentic unscripted answers.
  3. Partner with Influencers: you may be working at a small or niche organization that doesn’t have a ready-made following to find you on Periscope or Meerkat. Consider partnering with a person or organization that compliments what you’re trying to do, and has a dedicated following. Maybe you do a joint live stream. Maybe you sponsor an influencer’s personal stream at your brand’s event.
  4. Be Creative: the benefit of a new app or platform is that there are no established rules. Some of the more obvious uses are at events like New York Fashion Week or a big press announcement. Imagine a designer streaming and giving live commentary as their collection is on the runway. Maybe your CEO is about to give a big speech and decides to stream a preview to the announcement. Better yet, why doesn’t the CEO break some news on Meerkat? If you’re thinking about distributing a piece of content on other social media channels, take a second and see if there’s an opportunity to do it via live stream.
  5. Test and Learn: your first live stream may attract five thousand viewers. It may attract no viewers. You might find that people enjoy when you stream video from brainstorms in your conference room or you might find that you only attract viewers when your celebrity spokespeople are hosting the stream. Give it a shot in various formats and track your results to see how they map back to your overall marketing goals.

 
Selfie Sticks

Oh – the selfie stick. Right. One big downside of these apps is arm strength. Who wants to hold their phone up during a basketball game or a concert or a press conference? Periscope should sell a branded stick through Twitter. I’d buy one.